Reviews

Vespers

Author: Irene Preston & Liv Rancourt31304181

Publisher: Prescourt Books

Publication Date: 13 September 2016

Rating: 3.5/5 Stars

Diversity: LGBT Characters (gay), People of Color (indian, black)

TW: religious homophobia, internalized homophobia, self harm

Summary: Thaddeus Dupont has had over eighty years to forget…

The vampire spends his nights chanting the Liturgy of the Hours and ruthlessly disciplines those unnatural urges he’s vowed never again to indulge. He is at the command of the White Monks, who summon him at will to destroy demons. In return, the monks provide for his sustenance and promise the return of his immortal soul.

Sarasija Mishra’s most compelling job qualification might be his type O blood…

The 22-year-old college grad just moved across the country to work for some recluse he can’t even find on the internet. Sounds sketchy, but the salary is awesome and he can’t afford to be picky. On arrival he discovers a few details his contract neglected to mention, like the alligator-infested swamp, the demon attacks, and the nature of his employer’s “special diet”. A smart guy would leave, but after one look into Dupont’s mesmerizing eyes, Sarasija can’t seem to walk away. Too bad his boss expected “Sara” to be a girl.

Falling in love is hard at any age…

The vampire can’t fight his hungers forever, especially since Sara’s brought him light, laughter and a very masculine heat. After yielding to temptation, Thaddeus must make a choice. Killing demons may save his soul, but keeping the faith will cost him his heart.

Goodreads

Order here: Amazon

Disclaimer: I received an e-copy of this book on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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A religious demon fighting vampire, who kills demons for the Catholic Church. Or more accurate for a group called White Monks. His goal is redemption and a new chance for his immortal soul. But when a mistake is made and his new Personal Assistant turns out to be a man it all gets way more confusing and difficult. Does he still want to work with the Catholic Church in exchange for his immortal soul or does he want to follow his heart?

Sara thinks he is just there to be a Personal Assistant. You know, take phone calls, write e-mails, that kind of stuff. However, after Thaddeus saves him from a demon he realizes that his new boss is not quite human. Still, he wants to assist and not just help his boss with his “Special Diet”.

On top of all this, Thaddeus Manager Ms. Alves is nowhere to be found. Together they embark on a trip to find the truth.

Even though a split POV is something that is often overdone, it worked well with this novel, as we got great insight in both characters, which I enjoyed a lot. Thaddeus also often used French Exclamations in his POVs, which is nice, but at times confusing.

I liked that Sara was raised Hindu, even though he isn’t practicing at first, there are many references to his faith later on. I also enjoyed the fact that Nohea, a black woman, liked women, even though it was only mentioned in passing.

The story was fast paced and there was a lot of witty remarks towards the demons, which I enjoyed.

However at points characters appeared and then disappeared and left loose ends which confused me. The ending is also very abrupt. Not a cliffhanger, just sudden.

I enjoyed the book for the most part though, even though there are still some questions to be answered, which will probably happen in the next book.

Why I read it: It sounded interesting

Do I recommend it: If you enjoy paranormal gay romance with a bit of will-they-wont-they and murderous demons, read this book.

 

 

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One thought on “Vespers

  1. Thank you for sharing your thoughts and review. I am not sure this book is one I would be interested in; however, there seems to be a lot going on here regarding identity and the struggle between religion and sexual orientation. There is definitely a need for more books with this kind of representation & commentary, especially in the paranormal romance genre.

    Like

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